entire contents copyright © 1995 - 2003 The Theater Mirror.
All Rights Reserved

Show me Larry's Daily Update Now!

( You are visitor number to the Theater Mirror.)
Counter kindly provided by

as a courtesy to the Theater Mirror.

NEW TODAY: Friday - Monday 9 - 12 May
A new review (of "Sweeney Todd" in R.I.) from Tony Annicone,
A new quick-take (on "Two by Two") from Russell R. Greene
and TWO more (on "Romulus" & Cat ") from Will Stackman,
A new review (of "Chicago") from Tony Annicone,
A new review (of "Cabaret") from Larry Stark,
NEW REVIEW (OF "Veronica Vavoom, Vulcanologist") from Carl A. Rossi
A new review (of "Tintypes") from Caroline Burlingham Ellis
A new Audition-Call in AUDITIONS ... and ...
Far too many new SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS to count!
A NEW Page OF MISSIVES FROM GERALYN HORTON,
A stg.mgr !!!EMERGENCY!!! (#4!!)

THE HORTON CONNECTION

7 May 2003 15:25:41 -0400
"why 'Sweeny Todd' is not to be missed.... "

9 Apr 2003 17:15:25 -0400 === "Kushner......library
[fom playwright Monica Raymond]

8 Apr 2003 18:27:34 -0400 === "Kushner, Lucas, Vogel at the Boston Public Library "

Geralyn Horton
Newton, MA
Go see my SHORT PLAYS
http://www.stagepage.info/oneact/_oneact.html
Geralyn Horton
Newton, MA
Check out my FREE MONOLOGS
http://www.stagepage.info/monologs/_monologs.html

Click on anything that is
BLUE
to see more.

The HORTON Connection
IRNE Awards! etc.
Cricket's Notebook
THAT WAS THE YEAR THAT WAS '02
New Auditions
Special Announcements
EMERGENCIES
New Reviews
Quick Takes
New Greenroom Mail
New Websites
Theater Mirror Resources
Car-talks, Lunches & Gossip
New Theater Journal
Bargains
Coming Attractions
Plays Opening This Week
Three "Summer Vacation" letters
Plays Up And Running
FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD
Letters from The APPLE
Cabaret Page
Features
Stories

Operating Instructions

Here is a summary look at what's NEW in The Theater Mirror
Click on anything that is
BLUE
to see more.


entire contents copyright © 1995 - 2003 The Theater Mirror.
All Rights Reserved

Larry Stark's THEATER MIRROR

The Theater Arts Magazine of the Internet



Need_title.jpg (25807 bytes)

BARGAINS

=+=+=+=+=+=+=

Nothing else so far

When we find them, we tell you about them!
============================

Cricket's Notebook

Thurday 27 March, 2003 11:59 a m:

"Why I Don't
Just Quit

I could, of course.
I could pull the plug, buy a vcr, and use my library card to see movies, read books, and hibernate.
Why don't I?

continued

That Was THE YEAR That Was

2002




!!!EMERGENCIES!!!

These cries for Immediate Help came in via e-mail on the date at the end

[Automatic removal after ONE week]

=+=+=6 May=+=+=

=+=+=+=+=

Dear Larry, we spoke today. I need a festival stage manager for the Hovey Summer Shorts Festival. It is very challenging but a total blast to work on and invloved the original short plays of 19 playwrights and 8 composers, mixing original songs and short plays over two weekends in July from the 17th to the 26th. Any interested people can reach me by calling Jerry Bisantz at 781-894-0081 or e-mail me at Jbisantz@attbi.com
Thanks a lot, Larry. This is our 7th S Shorts and promises to be our best

=+=+=5 May=+=+=

=+=+=+=+=

deperate cry from Sam Rush:
I have lost an actor for the role of Mohammed in THE TALE OF THE ALLERGISTS WIFE by Charles Busch. Please spread the word.
It is a non-Equity role. Mohammed is a "boyish, good-looking 22 year old from Iraq." He has three nice scenes in the play. Rehearsals begin June 10 and the run is June 19-29 - ten performances total.
We offer $150 per week plus room.
Please send headshots and emails to attention of Sam Rush,
New Century Theatre
P.O. Box 186
Northampton, MA 01061-0186
For more info. on NCT's 2003 season, you can visit our website: http://www.smith.edu/theatre/nct
Many thanks

=+=+=1 May=+=+=

=+=+=+=+=

URGENT!!!!!
The Boston Directors' Lab is urgently seeking a male actor, non-union, 25-35 for the role of Jerry in "The Zoo Story". In the style of Jack Nicholson in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest".
Performance dates: June 12-21 at Central Square YMCA.
Call Ian as soon as possible at 617 767 8770 to arrange an audition.

=+=+=24 April=+=+=

=+=+=+=+=

EMERGENCY: Male Lead needed!!
Ashley Brooks (The Flamboyant Gossip): Male of Stage Age of late 20's - mid 30's; Strong Acting and Solid Vocals (Bari-Tenor w/range of A to A) Some Dancing; Gay Ashley's "over-the-top" dramatic nature makes him "lovable" (at least that's what he keeps telling the mail boy) and serves as the office comedian without even knowing it.
"The BIG Time" by WESJAM Productions
Please visit http://www.thebigtime.net/>www.thebigtime.net

What You Need to Know: (North Andover, MA)
Show Dates: July 11, 12 and July 25, 26 - All four show are at 8pm
(Please consider those weeks - tech weeks)
Rehearsals: Starting May 4th - July 2nd The following is tentative/ subject to change: Sundays 4pm - 8pm (Full Cast), Tues 6:30pm - 9:30pm (Leads), Wed 6:30pm - 9:30 pm (Singers/Dancers); you will only be at 2 of the 3 rehearsals.
If you are interested or have any question/concerns, please email Wendy - wes@thebigtime.net ASAP!!!!

=+=+=+=+=

Nothing else so far


North Shore Music  Theatre
The Actor's Center TLP Join Theatermirror's Banner Program
entire contents copyright © 1995 - 2003 The Theater Mirror.
All Rights Reserved

Larry Stark's THEATER MIRROR

The Theater Arts Magazine of the Internet



QUICK-TAKES

Short notes about what YOU just saw.....

From: "Russ Greene" rrgreene@hotmail.com
Subject: Quick take: TWO BY TWO at NCP
Date: Sun, 11 May 2003 13:37:06 -0400
Larry,
I had to write to encourage you, and anyone else who might have the opprtunity to see the wonderful and warm production of TWO BY TWO now playing at Newton Country Players. The ensemble is tight, the vocals superb, the costumes well executed and correct, the pace is just right, a touching and charming production. Nothing unusual about an NCP show, I grant you. BUT, this is also a great 'theater story'...

You see, the show went through a major cast change at the last minute. The actor originally cast as Noah was unable to perform and with only 5 days notice, Jim Fitzpatrick stepped in to play a role in a show he had only seen once 10 years ago. If you know the show, you know how daunting a challenge this could be -- to give a reference point the part of Noah is larger than the role of Tevya in Fiddler. For a production to succeed as well as this one has with such an obstacle is truly the stuff of legends. I would have recommended this charming production to anyone without having known this backstage story, but knowing it (because you couldn't tell that Jim hadn't been cast from the beginning) makes it even that more impressive. The entire cast, crew, production team, and the staff of NCP have all pulled together and pulled off something, well, magical.

The production has only 2 or 3 performances left and the seating is limited. But if you want to see a real theater success story, and a heckuva good show to boot, get thee to TWO BY TWO.
Cheers,
Russ

From: "will stackman" To: larry@theatermirror.com Subject: I forgot. Date: Sun, 11 May 2003 17:20:06 -0400 X-OriginalArrivalTime: 11 May 2003 21:20:07.0656 (UTC) FILETIME=[18CCF680:01C31803] X-MIME-Autoconverted: from 8bit to quoted-printable by ns1.speedhost.net id RAA20402 X-Rcpt-To: X-Spam-Status: No, hits=1.7 required=6.0 tests=FROM_ENDS_IN_NUMS,SPAM_PHRASE_00_01 version=2.44 X-Spam-Level: * X-DPOP: Version number supressed Here's "Cat Mountain" for pasting. ----

From: "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject: Quicktake - ”CAT MOUNTAIN"
Date:Sun, May 11, 2003 11 AM
Quicktake on "Cat Mountain" by Behind the Mask Theatre

In the past few months, devotees of mask theatre have been able to enjoy Behind the Mask Theatre's latest fantasy, first at the Coolidge Corner Theatre; then at the Cambridge Center for Adult Education, their home base, evenings last weekend at the Puppet Showplace, and upcoming, their final performance at Central Congregational in J.P. on Sat. May 17th at 2pm. “Cat Mountain” combines impressive mask

s derived from the Japanese Noh tradition with authentic costumes to tell an imaginative original folktale in the Cinderella mode. Mask-maker/performers Eric Bornstein (Storyteller) and Deborah Coconnis (Mistress Hatemori & Secret, the Cat) are joined by Kelly Cutler as Sho, the heroine, dancers Leda Elliot & Rachel Fouts, plus David Kessler as the traditional Oriental stagehand (Kuroko) in black. Kessler, along with Paul Rehm and Cutler, is responsible for the shadow show which describes Sho’s journey to "Cat Mountain." The setting was designed by Moriah Tumbleston. Another solid stage piece from the troupe which performed "The Monkey King" last year. This year's live music is performed by singer/songwriter, Patricia Vlieg . You have one more chance to see this show. Central Congregational has a parking lot and is a short walk from the Green St. stop on the Orange Line.
"Cat Mountain" created by Behind the Mask Theatre, May
Behind the Mask at Central Congregational
85 Seaver St., Jamaica Plain (617) 876-7412; www.behindthemask.org

From: "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject: Quicktake - ”ROMULUS"
Date:Sat, May 12, 2003
Quicktake on Romulus at Theatre Cooperative

The Coop's season closer is an amusing, somewhat leisurely romp through the end of the Roman Empire as imagined by Durenmatt(1949 - Four Acts- after WWII) and refurbished a while back by Gore Vidal (1963 - Two Acts - Vietnam heating up). The play's take on empire and "Civilization" might be relevant today. Jason Myatt makes a fine Emperor/chicken breeder, Eve Passeltiner a strong Empress, Mare Bayard their histrionic daughter Rea, and IRNE winner Forrest Walter a striking "ghost" as Aemelian, her P.O.W. fiance. Rodney Raftery is Romulus' nemesis, Ottaker the Goth, who's a bit of a surprise. Gerald Slattery plays Otto Rupf, millionaire, who'll save the empire, providing everyone switches from togas to pants. This textile mogul also wants Rea. Mostly farce, with a touch of philosophy, the show takes place an open thrust backed by bright "outsider art" scene painting with quite respectable costumes. Take a short trip to Broadway (Somerville) before the end of the month for a bit of speculative history and some wry laughs.
"Romulus" by freely adapted by Gore Vidal, May 9 - 31
Theatre Cooperative at Peabody House
277 Broadway, Somerville, (617) 625-1300

from GERALYN HORTON
An avid theater-goer friend of my daughter's who saw the New Rep's "SWEENEY" said that in her not-so-humble opinion it is better than the NYC original, which she saw and thought wonderful, or any other production of it she's seen since.

I have no other live productions to compare it to: much as I admire Sondheim, the story is so cruel that I've only listened to the cd and watched the video productions that were carried by PBS. It is certainly better than those. But comparisons aside, Rick's New Rep staging is a marvel! Seamless and confident and brilliant, it will make your hair stand on end. Not to be missed! And it makes one proud to be part of a community that can achieve work of such quality.

From: "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject: Quicktake - ”Veronika Vavoom, Volcanologist"
Date: Sun, May 4, 2003 11:37 PM
Quicktake on VERONIKA VAVOOM, VOLCANOLOGIST

Those who caught "VV,V" in last year's BTW Unbound New Play series will want to take a look at it reworked and in full production. Others with a taste for somewhat uneven adventurous playwrighting in the Fornes/Kopit/Durang mode may have a good time at this peculiar and ultimately moving show. With a two-level set by J.Michael Griggs draped in red, and high-energy performances by Jenny Israel in the title role, Chris Brophy as her former boyfriend, Jonathan Silver as an extremely troubled teen, Ann Barry as a bit of everything, and IRNE winning actress Maureen Keiller in a dual role as the boy's over-the-top mother, and Veronika's as well, this production rocks. Actually, it's the Motown soundscape complete with choreography interspersed with ominous rumblings, but ... Check it out for the next two weekends, then take at look at this year's BTW Unbound 2003 at the very end of May.
" VERONIKA VAVOOM, VOLCANOLOGIST" by Olga Humphrey, May 2 -18
Boston Theatre Works at Boston Playwrights' Theatre
949 Comm. Ave. Allston, (617) 728-4321

Date: Sun, 04 May 2003 11:35:20 -0400
From: "Larry Stark's Theater Mirror" larry@theatermirror.com
Subject: "Perfect" --- FOOL FOR LOVE & ONCE UPON A MATTRESS In the past three days I was privileged to see a light, frothy little comedy and a dark, quirky drama, and each one Flawlessly brought to the stage. (Yeah yeah, nothing in theater is ever "flawless"; but you didn't see these shows, I did. The word stands.)

The Turtle Lane Playhouse uses a sort of "two-platoon system" that plugs excellent "understudies" into several roles at odd times during their runs. That means you may Not see Susan Walsh play the logorheic Queen or Jennifer Condon play Princess "Fred" nor Aimee Doherty play Lady Larkin in the Mary Rodgers/Marshall Barer comedy "Once Upon A Mattress" as I did. So what?
The show is a genuine delight for which I WILL give a full review, but here I must paraphrase it's prologue:
"You can tell a lady by the cut of her hair
But a genuine Cut-Up is exceedingly rare!"

"Fool for Love" is at The Industrial Theatre, a few blocks from Harvard Square, and it is the kind of carefully crafted production for which my tired cliche "riveting" was originally invented. The pace is deliberate and engrossing, the pauses and the "comic relief" lines perfectly placed, the games with theatrical reality astonishing, the set as garishly tawdry as any motel-room, the cast physically flawless, and the sound and lighting effects so subtle and so effective I will, again, need a full review to try to do them justice.

If you think you like good theater, go first to "Fool For Love" (it won't last more than one more week-end, damn it!) and then to "Once Upon A Mattress".
If you don't like either of them, I'll pay you back the price of your ticket.
And, on my budget, I cannot afford to make such a promise lightly.
Love,
===Anon.
( a k a That Fat Old Man with The Cane )

From: "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject: Quicktake - ”Once Upon a Mattress"
Date:Fri, May 2, 2003 11:01 PM
Quicktake on ONCE UPON A MATTRESS

Want to take the family to a musical, but have some reservations about the subject matter of "Sweeney Todd", "Side Show", or even "Man of La Mancha" ? Turtle Lane Playhouse's current offering, Mary Rodger's fairytale "Once Upon a Mattress" might be just the ticket. Ron Dion's set is charming, Robert Itzak's costumes are colorful and comic, the cast is in fine voice, and director Jerry Bisantz gets all the laughs in the right place. Marshal Barer's lyrics have just a hint of Mary's famous father's first partner, Lorenz Hart, and music director Wayne Ward's tight ensemble is careful not to drown out the words. Perri Chouteau or Jennifer Condon are adorable as princess Fred --Winifred-- and Jim Jordan plays Prince Dauntless the Drab as a lovable nebbish. Chuck Walsh is a delightfully dotty Wizard, Eric Rubin an energetic King, especially when chasing after the female chorus, and Susan Walsh or Abigale Cordell wonderful nags as Queen Aggravain. So go take another look at the show which made Carol Burnett famous, and will make almost anyone smile. You won't have to think about it.
"Once Upon A Mattress" music by Mary Rodgers, lyrics by Marshall Barer,
book by Jay Thompsom, Marshall Barer, and Dean Fuller, April 25 - June 1
Turtle Lane Playhouse
283 Melrose St, Newton (617) 244-0169

From "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject Quicktake -" SideShow"
DateThurs, May 1, 2003 10 AM
Quicktake on SIDESHOW
If the negatives in some published reviews of the climax to one the Lyric's most interesting seasons cause music theatre fans to skip "SideShow", it will be their loss. Spiro Veloudos' production of this gritty fable is probably superior to its somewhat overblown Broadway antecedent. The cast, headed by Maryann Zschau(Daisy), Susan Molloy(Violet), Christopher Chew(Terry), and Peter A. Carey(Buddy) handle Kreiger's sung-through score with exceptional skill, not to mention another stunning performance by Brian R. Robinson as Jake. The rest of the ensemble is musically sound as well. Janie E. Howland's fluid set is a wonder and Gail Astrid Buckley's costumes, which turn a cast of seventeen into over fifty characters, are just right. Lyric's"SideShow" adds up to an "attraction" that get's more interesting as you think about it.
"SideShow", book & lyrics - Bill Mitchell, music - Henry Krieger April 25 - May 31
Lyric Stage Company, Copley Square
140 Clarendon St. Boston, (617) 437 - 7172

From: "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject: Quicktake-”Sweeney Todd"
Date:Tues, Apr 29, 2003 1:28 PM
Quicktake on SWEENEY TODD:the Demon Barber of Fleet Street

It’s an old-fashioned penny-dreadful melodrama brought to seething life by one of the best musical theatre ensembles assembled hereabouts in a longtime. As usual, Rick Lombardo works directorial magic in the New Rep’s intimate hall, aided and abetted by Peter Colao’s intricate protean set.

Todd Alan Johnson plays Sweeney with relish, while Nancy E. Carroll as Mrs. Lovett reminds all just how good a musical performer she can be. Music director Janet Roma keeps cast and musicians under total control. Speakeasy veteran Leigh Barrett makes the Beggar Woman into a role worth watching.

Brent Reno and Lianne Grasso play the young lovers with engaging awakwardness. Paul D. Farwell and Bob Zolli make Judge Turpin and Beadle Banford villians worth hissing, while being musically impeccable. BosCon student Austin Lesch is appealing an Tobias the crippled boy and Even Harrington as Pirelli the Italian Barber has just the right phony operatic sound. Frances Nelson McSherry and Christine Alger costume one and all through myriad changes with believable Dickensian wear.

And Production stage manager Greg Nashe’s crew manages to stay almost invisble as the cast appears to change sets through more than two dozen scenes. Don’t miss this one; advance sales are already quite substantial.
"Sweeney Todd:" book by Hugh Wheeler, music & lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, Apr. 24 - May 25
New Repertory Theatre
62 Lincoln, Newton Highlands, (617)-332-1646.

Nothing else so far

New Reviews

"Chicago"

Reviewed by Tony Annicone

Academy Players closing show of their 47th season is Kander and Ebb's 1975 vaudeville type musical, "Chicago". Based on the 1926 play by Maurine Watkins, the musical version revival in 1997 won six Tony awards and the movie version won the Oscar for best picture this year. In roaring twenties Chicago, married chorine, Roxie Hart murders her faithless lover, Fred Casely. She and fellow murderess, Velma Kelly, both on death row, vie for the spotlight and headlines, hoping the publicity will launch them to fame, freedom and successful stage careers. This sharp edged tale of murder, exploitation and treachery was well ahead of its time in 1975. It works much better after the OJ trail to show the circus like atmosphere presented in 1920's Chicago. Director Mike Farrelly takes his 24 member cast and leads them in a top notch professional production that at times is far superior to the 1975 Broadway version, making it one of the must see shows this season.

"Chicago" (9 - 18 May )
ACADEMY PLAYERS
Odeum Theatre, Main Street, EAST GREENWICH, RHODE ISLAND
1 (401)885-6910

"Cabaret"

Reviewed by Larry Stark

"Cabaret" keeps evolving --- from Christopher Isherwood's "Berlin Stories" to the stage and film as "I Am A Camera" to the Kander & Ebb musical to Bob Fosse's very different film to a completely new take in a recent Broadway revival; it's like a sinster snake with ever-changing skins. The longwood Players' "Cabaret" is an oddly compartmentalized production. Much like Isherwood's fractured original, it has several loosely connected parts that seem separately rehearsed and never fully integrated, despite the excellence of each part judged on its own terms.
Uppermost, to my eye, is the doomed love affair of two aging Germans: the realist landlady (Anna Price) and the romantic Jewish fruit-seller (Curtis A. Challenger). Tenderly sung and movingly acted, this is a neat theatrical gem. (So what if Herr Schultz is Black and Fraulein Schneider Carribean? Their playing together is superb!)

THE LONGWOOD PLAYERS

Cambridge Family YMCA Theatre, 820 Massachusetts Avenue, CAMBRIDGE MA
1(617) 566-3513

Musical revue at Vokes
Strong voices reenergize forgotten songs

Reviewed by Caroline Burlingham Ellis

Perhaps when the patriotic revue “Tintypes,” a musical celebration the turn of the 19th century, was selected for the current Vokes season, everyone was focused on honoring a nation attacked on Sept. 11. Current events can change the way any production is perceived, and today the show, although feelingly delivered by five sprightly and talented singers (Jim Ansart, Sarah Consentino, Tom Dinger, Yolanda Minor and Kaja Schuppert), telegraphs a somewhat simplistic view of America.

"Tintypes" (till 17 May)
VOKES PLAYERS
Beatrice Herford's Vokes Theatre, Route 20, WAYLAND
1(508)358-4034

"Veronika Vavoom, Volcanologist"

Reviewed by Carl A. Rossi

The “cutting-edge” portion of VERONIKA VAVOOM, VOLCANOLOGIST is that the female lead is (drum roll, please) a volcanologist and that half of the action takes place inside Galeras, a still-active volcano. Change the former to a social worker and the latter to more terra firma, and you have the rather predictable tale of a woman who first rescues and then is saddled with George, a troubled youth; Veronika tries reconciling the boy with Browyn, his cold socialite mother, while dealing with her own troubled past; George commits suicide in the end. (VERONIKA VAVOOM, VOLCANOLOGIST is billed as “a hysterical new comedy that will have audiences erupting with laughter!”, mind you.)

"Veronika Vavoom, Volcanologist" (2 - 18 May)
BOSTON THEATRE WORKS
Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, 949 Commonwealth Avenue, BOSTON, MA
1 (617) 939-9939

Resonant "Fool"
at Industrial

Reviewed by Beverly Creasey

Maria Brandt directs Sam Shepard’s volatile FOOL FOR LOVE with a hint of the surreal…so each time a door is slammed or a fist pounds the wall, the sound echoes like thunder, as if the gods had been disturbed. (Shepard’s plays reverberate with mythological taboos so why not hear the reverberation?) May and Eddie can’t stay together and they can’t stay apart. They seem unable to live their lives without “little tortures.” Eddie is a cowboy drawn to “hooch, the slammer and women” and May, try as she might, can’t find happiness without him. When May isn’t clinging to Eddie, she’s grabbing at the walls for support, as if fearing that if she lets go, they’ll come tumbling down.

"Fool for Love"

A Minority Report by Carl A. Rossi

You may not find a more moving, tormented love epic west of TRISTAN UND ISOLDE then that of May and Eddie, two drifters who can’t live together yet can’t live apart …. The Industrial production is no less wonderful than the play for director Maria Brandt has staged it to a “T”; I read the script before attending an Industrial performance and can vouch for Ms. Brandt’s faith (and trust) in Mr. Shepard’s intentions.

"Fool for Love" (25 April - 10 May)
INDUSTRIAL THEATRE
Leverett Old Library Theatre, Mill Street, Harvard Square, CAMBRIDGE MA
1(617) 496-2222

It's A Mad, Mad,
Mad, Mad "Matress"

Reviewed by Beverly Creasey

Once upon a time there was a sweet, but dated musical, called "Once Upon A Matress" which made carol Burnett a star. What if you bombarded that charming little musical with every --- and I do mean every --- pop culture joke you could wring from the script? You'd get the Turtle Lane Playhouse's wacky, off the wall, very contemporary production of the 1959 Mary Rogers musical.

from "Quick Takes"

From: "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject: Quicktake - ”Once Upon a Mattress"
Date:Fri, May 2, 2003 11:01 PM
Quicktake on ONCE UPON A MATTRESS

Want to take the family to a musical, but have some reservations about the subject matter of "Sweeney Todd", "Side Show", or even "Man of La Mancha" ? Turtle Lane Playhouse's current offering, Mary Rodger's fairytale "Once Upon a Mattress" might be just the ticket. Ron Dion's set is charming, Robert Itzak's costumes are colorful and comic, the cast is in fine voice, and director Jerry Bisantz gets all the laughs in the right place. Marshal Barer's lyrics have just a hint of Mary's famous father's first partner, Lorenz Hart, and music director Wayne Ward's tight ensemble is careful not to drown out the words. Perri Chouteau or Jennifer Condon are adorable as princess Fred --Winifred-- and Jim Jordan plays Prince Dauntless the Drab as a lovable nebbish. Chuck Walsh is a delightfully dotty Wizard, Eric Rubin an energetic King, especially when chasing after the female chorus, and Susan Walsh or Abigale Cordell wonderful nags as Queen Aggravain. So go take another look at the show which made Carol Burnett famous, and will make almost anyone smile. You won't have to think about it.
"Once Upon A Mattress" music by Mary Rodgers, lyrics by Marshall Barer,
book by Jay Thompsom, Marshall Barer, and Dean Fuller, April 25 - June 1

TURTLE LANE PLAYHOUSE 283 Melrose St, Newton (617) 244-0169
283 Melrose Street, NEWTON MA
1(617)244-01690

Both Sides Agaunst the Middle
in Lyric's Moving "Side Show"

A Minority Report by Beverly Creasey

Every once in a while you can catch Tod Browning’s bizarre 1932 film FREAKS on late night TV: A cult classic because horror meister Browning enlisted actual circus folk from the side show to play murderous versions of themselves in the movie…And because “Siamese Twins” Violet and Daisy Hilton appear in the film.
Playwright Bill Russell and composer Henry Krieger exploit the latter fact in their oddly touching musical, SIDE SHOW, now up at the Lyric through the end of the month. The twins, or at least one of the two desperately wants to become a movie star. (We now know that the only film they ever made sadly presented them as freaks of nature.)

from "Quick Takes"

A Minority Report by Will Stackman

From "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject Quicktake -" SideShow"
DateThurs, May 1, 2003 10 AM
Quicktake on SIDESHOW
If the negatives in some published reviews of the climax to one the Lyric's most interesting seasons cause music theatre fans to skip "SideShow", it will be their loss. Spiro Veloudos' production of this gritty fable is probably superior to its somewhat overblown Broadway antecedent. The cast, headed by Maryann Zschau(Daisy), Susan Molloy(Violet), Christopher Chew(Terry), and Peter A. Carey(Buddy) handle Kreiger's sung-through score with exceptional skill, not to mention another stunning performance by Brian R. Robinson as Jake. The rest of the ensemble is musically sound as well. Janie E. Howland's fluid set is a wonder and Gail Astrid Buckley's costumes, which turn a cast of seventeen into over fifty characters, are just right. Lyric's "SideShow" adds up to an "attraction" that get's more interesting as you think about it.

"Side Show"

A Minority Report by Larry Stark

The real key to "Side Show" is the character Jake --- "The Cannibal King" at the start of the show --- played by Brian R. Robinson. Late in the play, he says what has been obvious in subtext throughout the play: "Violet, no one can love you the way I do. marry me!" to which she responds "I couldn't marry you! What would people think!" --- because it's the 1930's and Jake is Black. The irony of course is that the woman Jake loves is permanently joined to her "Siamese" sister. She (Susan Molloy) and Daisy (Maryann Zschau) start as uneducated "freaks" gratefully owned by their boss (Steven Dascoulias), but as their dozen fellow "exhibits" prove with a dizzying series of changes of Gail Astrid Buckley's costumes, the distinction between "freak" and "person" depends on who is doing the looking, and when.

"Side Show"

Reviewed by Jennifer Mischley

“Come look at the freaks!” From the moment the cast sings this first line of the show to the last line of “I Will Never Leave You” the talented cast of Side Show draws you close to the ugly and beautiful dichotomy of the true-life story of Daisy and Violet Hilton. The Lyric Stage Company of Boston, under the direction of Spiro Veloudos, has pulled together a scaled down and extremely intimate production of this short-lived but provocative Broadway musical.

"Side Show" (25 April - 31 May)
LYRIC STAGE COMPANY OF BOSTON, INC.
140 Clarendon Street, BOSTON , MA
1(617) 437-7172

"Betty's Summer Vacation"

Reviewed by Tony Annicone

2nd Story Theatre's current show is "Betty's Summer Vacation" written by Christopher Durang in 1999. (He is best known for his 1980 show, "Sister Mary Igantius Expalins It All for You") Betty and her friend Trudy are young women who rent rooms at Mrs Seizmagragg's cottage on the New Jersey shoreline for the summer. The vacation quickly turns into an adventure into the darker sides of all the summer renters at the house. Individuals clash when their private desires and fears erupt into violence. They are egged on by the cottage itself, which is alive and feeds on the entertainment provided by the renters. This show questions the role of reality- based entertainment, post-modernism and the pursuit of pleasure without concern for others in a spiritually lacking current day society. Director Ed Shea takes this absurdist show and molds it into a funny but frightening look at the world we live in. He accomplishes this feat with his 9 talented actors who keep you laughing and thinking from start to finish in this riveting presentation.

"Betty's Summer Vacation" (4 April - 17 May)
2ND STORY THEATRE
28 Market Street, WARREN, RHODE ISLAND
1 (401) 247-4200

"Sweeney Todd"

Reviewed by Larry Stark

Go. Don't read any further, just go. You will never hear or see a better production of this masterpiece, so pick up the phone now. Though if you haven't arranged for tickets already, you'd better pray the run's extended and be prepared to wait in line. If you're lucky enough, these are a few of the things you can expect to experience:

from "Quick Takes"

A Minority Report by Will Stackman

From: "will stackman" profwlll@yahoo.com
Subject: Quicktake-”Sweeney Todd"
Date:Tues, Apr 29, 2003 1:28 PM
Quicktake on SWEENEY TODD:the Demon Barber of Fleet Street

It’s an old-fashioned penny-dreadful melodrama brought to seething life by one of the best musical theatre ensembles assembled hereabouts in a longtime. As usual, Rick Lombardo works directorial magic in the New Rep’s intimate hall, aided and abetted by Peter Colao’s intricate protean set.

Todd Alan Johnson plays Sweeney with relish, while Nancy E. Carroll as Mrs. Lovett reminds all just how good a musical performer she can be. Music director Janet Roma keeps cast and musicians under total control. Speakeasy veteran Leigh Barrett makes the Beggar Woman into a role worth watching.

Brent Reno and Lianne Grasso play the young lovers with engaging awakwardness. Paul D. Farwell and Bob Zolli make Judge Turpin and Beadle Banford villians worth hissing, while being musically impeccable. BosCon student Austin Lesch is appealing an Tobias the crippled boy and Even Harrington as Pirelli the Italian Barber has just the right phony operatic sound. Frances Nelson McSherry and Christine Alger costume one and all through myriad changes with believable Dickensian wear.

And Production stage manager Greg Nashe’s crew manages to stay almost invisble as the cast appears to change sets through more than two dozen scenes. Don’t miss this one; advance sales are already quite substantial.

"Sweeney Todd" (23 April - 25 May)
NEW REPERTORY THEATRE
1161 Walnut St NEWTON HIGHLANDS MA
1(617) 332-1646

Man of La Mancha
at the Stoneham Theatre

Reviewed by Will Stackman

Walking into the Stoneham Theatre for "Man of La Mancha", the audience is confronted by Ted Simpson's massive dungeon set with a huge set of steps looming overhead. When the lights dim and the cast slithers in to the sound of a lone guitarist, clanking echoes through the hall instead of an overture and the stairs descend slowly. This '60s adaptation of the world's first great novel is one of the landmarks in the development of the American Musical Theatre. This music drama born on the tiny stage of the Goodspeed Opera House on the banks of the Connecticut River went on to run some 2300 performances in New York, played worldwide including a version adapted by and starring Jacques Brel in Paris, and is currently back on Broadway starring Brian Stokes Mitchell. (The 1972 film with Peter O'Toole, Sophia Loren, and James Coco is best forgotten.)

"Man of La Mancha (25 April - 18 May)
THE STONEHAM THEATRE
395 Main St. STONEHAM MA
781 - 279 - 2200

Musical revue at Vokes
Strong voices reenergize forgotten songs

A Minority Report by Caroline Burlingham Ellis reprinted from the Wayland Town Crier

Perhaps when the patriotic revue “Tintypes,” a musical celebration the turn of the 19th century, was selected for the current Vokes season, everyone was focused on honoring a nation attacked on Sept. 11. Current events can change the way any production is perceived, and today the show, although feelingly delivered by five sprightly and talented singers (Jim Ansart, Sarah Consentino, Tom Dinger, Yolanda Minor and Kaja Schuppert), telegraphs a somewhat simplistic view of America.

"Tintypes"

Reviewed by Carl A. Rossi

TINTYPES is a tune-filled panorama; a musical melting pot; the Great American Songbook come to life. It offers snapshots ­ tintypes, if you will ­ of America in its last Age of Innocence (the twenty years or so before World War I). There is no libretto per se --- the show being composed primarily of songs from the ragtime era --- though real and fictional characters do weave together various threads: Theodore Roosevelt (“TR”) who goes from Rough Rider to President (storming Panama with a child’s bucket and shovel to dig his Canal); the anarchist Emma Goldman; Anna Held, the glamorous first wife and leading lady of impresario Florenz Ziegfeld; Susannah, Ms. Held’s maid and representative of the downtrodden minorities; and, especially, Charlie, a Russian-Jewish emigrant whose wide-eyed wanderings take him from Ellis Island to becoming a photographer at show’s end.

"Tintypes" (24 April-17 May)
VOKES THEATRE
Route 20, WAYLAND, MA
1 (508) 358-4034

"Hay Piedras en el Cielo y son para el Trueno"

Reviewed by Larry Stark

Two different members of The Pilgrim Theatre (which calls itself a "research and performance collaborative") told me of taking their "Faust 2002" --- which had its world premiere in the BCA Cyclorama one year ago --- to Poland. They had to perform the show --- in English, mind you --- at one to three A M, outdoors, in the stone outdoor courtyard of a cold castle. And yet despite the hour, the cold, and the language barrier, their enthusiastic audience was as large as all their previous audience Combined, and the people loved the show.
It ain't the same here in Boston!
Instead of their own work, Pilgrim is hosting a series of performances by fellow theater artists: Perla Logarzo (co-founder of Argentina's Diablomundo company), the Chimaera Physical Theater, Tempest Productions, and the Serious Play! Theatre Ensemble. And here there may also be a "language barrier": the Boston audience seems in no way receptive to performances that add a Theatrical vocabulary of movement, dance, singing, spectacle, poetry and stage-picture to speech, text, and realistic playing.

"Crossing Borders" An Intercultural Engagement (17 April - 10 May)
PILGRIM THEATRE
"Hay Piedras en el Cielo y son para el Trueno" (17 - 26 April)
PERLA LOGARZO & ALEJANDRO BALBIS
"The Living Room" (25 & 26 April)
CHIMAERA PHYSICAL THEATER
"Body & Sold: Part One" (27 & 8 May)
TEMPEST PRODUCTIONS/DEBORAH LAKE FORTSON
"The Skriker" (9 & 10 May)
SERIOUS PLAY! THEATRE ENSEMBLE
"Murga!" WORKSHOP (3 - 5 May)
ALEJANDRO BALBIS
Boston Center for The Arts, 539 Tremont Street, BOSTON MA
1(617)426-2787 [Workshops 1(617)524-3002 4-9pm ONLY]]

THE GREENROOM

=+=+=+=+=+=

From: "jerry bisantz" jbisantz@attbi.com
Subject: Re: Ten minute Festivals
Date: Tue, 6 May 2003 00:03:03 -0400

Hello, Larry! And, hello, Harvey! I am so sorry I missed "Ballplayer" as I think that it's quite an achievement to write and produce a full length play, and I like to see as many as I can. Believe I've been there... done that... would love to have my full length's done, along with every other playwright I know. So... we look on our computers, see the full length's that we have written, shrug, say to ourselves "should I send them out again? Maybe there's somewhere I missed... there's a festival in Ohio somewhere.."

The problem with writing ten minute plays is that you can get stuck in the "ten minute rut". That doesn't mean that crafting a GOOD ten minute play is easy... just different. Most playwrights I know have full length's, one acts, and ten minute plays that they have written. I have three full lengths DARING me to finish them every time I turn on my computer! And I'll bet you do too... so.. yes, Harvey, I see your point. I believe that more full length original plays should be produced, but I believe that Mr. Mattson has a point about "putting fannies in the seats".

At Hovey this summer, we are shaking up the ten minute festival by adding original music by local composers between the original short plays. There are so many talented song writers who never get to hear their work performed, and we want to showcase the best of them. No one theater company can do EVERYTHING. We can all benefit from your forum here, Larry. I think the key is that we all should strive to keep original, fresh work on the local stages, no matter the length.

Rob Mattson has a wonderful website called "Storyfoundry". ANYONE can peruse a huge list of playwrights and story synopses... for free! Would that our local theaters could look in their own backyards first... is it so hard to at least look? (sigh) Aaaahhh... what the hell, so we continue to write. It's fun, it gets us out of our element, and once ina while, if we're lucky, SOMEONE leans forward in their seats and actually LISTENS and REACTS to something we wrote. And, Harvey, that is heaven no matter the length! Keep on writing, buddy!
Jerry Bisantz

=+=+=+=+=+=

From: "Harvey Soolman" ballplayerhs@attbi.com
Subject: crowds
Date: Sat, 3 May 2003 23:34:34 -0400

Hi Larry,
Just wanted to let you know that we finally have drawn some people to see Ballplayer. Last night we had 45 and tonight we nearly filled the place (capacity 85) and brought in 78 people. Sixty-seven were paid.
Harvey Soolman

=+=+=+=+=+=

From: "Robert Mattson" rmattson@charter.net
Subject: Response to Harvey's comments
Date: Sat, 3 May 2003 17:32:28 -0400

Dear Larry,
I had to drop you a line concerning the recent letter by Harvey Soolman. Let me first say that I know Harvey, who is a truly nice person and another of the hard-working Boston area playwrights that is striving to create good theater in an environment that often makes that difficult.

But, I have one disagreement with his comment about the crutch of 10-minute play festivals, and how theaters should be producing full shows by local playwrights. I do agree that it would be great to have every major, minor and community theater in the area devote one slot to the work of a local author each year, but there are reasons that doesn't happen. The major one being that we need to bring in an audience from the general populace that are hard enough to draw with a "name" playwright, never mind someone, who might have written a brilliant play but, who's name they have never heard.

Harvey just dealt with this reality when he, no doubt, put in tremendous effort in doing the near impossible, writing and producing his own full-length play. Writing a full-length is tough enough, and I applaud just going from idea to fully realized script. However, that more or less pales in comparison to producing a play from the ground up. In this case finding a space, director, actors, technicians, house managers etc. Then, the toughest part of all. Getting people to come to a show that is being done by a group with no built-in audience. Ask any established community theater and they'll tell you that they still have nights where they have to call family and friends to fill the house on the odd Friday. So, for just attempting this and getting his show up and running Harvey deserves a gold star and a round of back slaps.

Now on to the 10-minute festival issue. I agree that the 10-minute genre can be limiting. It's tough to tell a full story with depth in 10 minutes. It's much easier to produce something that is a "skit-ish" comedy in that time. That's not to say that dramas can't be done in 10 minutes that have real depth and emotion. I've recently seen great 10-minute pieces by Ronan Noone and Bill Doncaster that accomplish heartfelt drama in that time frame. So, while not everyone likes writing to a page limit, it can be done and done well.

But are 10-minute festivals a crutch? I don't think so. Full disclaimer here, I run the Acme New Works Winter Festival, which is a short play festival. In the past festivals we've done 20 - 30 minute pieces, this year we are limiting shows to 12-minutes to try to get more playwrights' works on stage. I personally love all the shorts festivals that go up each year, Hovey Summer Shorts, Playwrights Platform, Arlington Staged Reading Festival, Theatre Coop's Ritalin Readings and the Boston Theatre Marathon. While they might not be full-length and fully produced, these festivals get 100 to 150 new works by local authors in front of packed houses each year. There are even more programs such as the Theatre Coop, which then picks three authors to do a full one-act the following year, and even tries to do a full production of one of those author's works in subsequent years. That's a phenomenal program. Plus, many shows from the Marathon get published by Baker's Plays, getting many local authors their first publishing credit.

I mentioned that most of these festivals are sold out. Most of that is simple theater math. More people on stage equals more people in the seats. They do act as fund raisers for many theaters. So, in that case I do agree that they act as a crutch. But that crutch is being used to keep theaters walking with doors open and producing shows that involve local actors, directors, techs and hopefully, appreciative audiences.

So the next time I see Harvey, I'm going to give him his due for doing something great, but I'll also encourage him to write a great 10-minute short so more people can see his stuff.
-R

=+=+=+=+=+=

Date: Mon, 28 Apr 2003 13:12:40 -0400
From: Maria Brandt brandtm@bc.edu>
Subject: Fool For Love

Hi Larry,
I'm writing to ask you to come and see Sam Shepard's FOOL FOR LOVE, produced by Industrial Theatre. This is a special show. The cast and full design staff are bursting with talent--perhaps award-winning talent. And yet, we have not yet had a single reviewer come to see the show. Do you have any advice? Why is it so hard to get reviewers to come?

Anyway, I've attached below the e-mail announcement I sent out to family and friends. Of course, I can't promise any specific reaction. But I do feel strongly that something transformational happens on that stage during that hour and twenty-five minutes.
Also, it will be good to see you. It always is....
Best,
Maria Brandt

=+=+=+=+=+=

From: ACMEACTOR@aol.com
Date: Fri, 2 May 2003 20:49:23 EDT
Subject: RE: Harvey Soolman's letter

Dear Larry,
I just finished ready Harvey Soolman's letter in the Green Room and it left me ... unhappy to say the least. I agree Scott Heller's response to him was offensive and narrow minded but Mr. Soolman's comments on the 10-minute festivals and short plays was equally offensive. I would expect better from someone "in the trenches". As the Executive Director of one the local theater's that sponsors a festival of short pieces I think Mr. Soolman doesn't seem to understand that not everyone can or wants to write a full length, 2 act show. These festivals give new playwrights the chance to test the waters with their material and learn their trade. The festivals also gives so many more playwrights the chance to actually have their work produced. A short piece is no less a "show" than a longer one -- it's just shorter.
Also, while I'm sure The Charlestown Working Theater has no shortage of funds, these festivals provide a good income for the theatre's that produce them and contribute greatly to help keeping the doors open which is getting harder everyday with funding disappearing. I feel bad that Mr. Soolman felt he had to belittle other people's work to publicize his own. He does a disservice to the many groups, directors, actor and playwrights that take part in the short festival.
David Sheppard
Acme Theater Productions

=+=+=+=+=+=

From: "Harvey Soolman" ballplayerhs@attbi.com
Subject: in appreciation
Date: Fri, 2 May 2003 00:21:46 -0400

Dear Larry,
On behalf of my cast and crew and me I would like to express our growing appreciation for your attending our play Ballplayer and bestowing us with a review.

And with each performance that goes by it has become not so much that you gave us a favorable review - though certainly we appreciate that - it is that at least someone was out there who gave a damn.

This has been quite an education for me. Through five performances we have attracted literally zero - zip, nada - tickets from the numerous press releases to papers (dailies and weeklies), radio and TV outlets, tourist guide, hotels and the Charlestown pizza shop who was inserting a flyer in his delivery orders. Much to my amazement, the resulting calendar listings have not produced a single ticket for us over five shows.

So earlier this week I re-followed up on my heretofore futile efforts to get our big papers to give us a review. Got nowhere with the Herald and Phoenix. Had also been getting nowhere with The Globe; so I contacted someone I knew down there in the Arts. He is a former baseball player I had coached in high school, and he scooted down the hall to see Scott Heller, the Arts Editor.

I'm pretty hard to offend, but I did find the response pretty offensive. According to him, Heller said that we would probably not get reviewed, but that if new Red Sox GM Theo Epstein (who I also coached) had attended to let him know, and they might list some blurb in Names and Faces.

My response to Heller was as follows:

Dear Scott,
The first weekend of Ballplayer (Charlestown Working Theater) went off great artistically. The Theater Mirror called it "a relentless examination of obsession." For it is not what I would call a "baseball" play.

But the audience size was disappointing. Should our numbers be your concern? Not necessarily. Certainly, indirectly, a thriving art community is of benefit to us all.

But what you may find newsworthy is that this is an independent production that is tired of the tin cup mentality of local theater and went about this with no public arts funding support. I feel the actors and I have devoted ourselves to getting a good show out to the public, and now have to see about getting the public there.

There is a second aspect of this, too, a line I am most proud of in the Theater Mirror review: "How many Boston playwrights can boast a full-length play this well-crafted?"

This brings us to another issue I have with local theater - the constant crutch of relying on 10-minute festivals and other short plays when we need to develop a more complete product, a show!

I feel we have done this with Ballplayer. I think it is worthy of your attention not because I wrote it, I think it is a good play and we need more people in the seats. I firmly believe, as a former newspaper person myself, that this play is newsworthy.

I really hate writing short plays.

And I would appreciate the opportunity to speak with you and hope you will accept my invitation to Thursday night's performance to see the product for yourself.

I hope you will also consider having someone review this play.
Yours truly,
Harvey Soolman

Well, Larry, not surprisingly I have not received a response. You really stand out, and I thank you.
Harvey Soolman

=+=+=+=+=+=

From: "Giagrando, David M." David_Giagrando@dfci.harvard.edu
Subject: Reviews
Date: Wed, 23 Apr 2003 15:24:03 -0400

Hi Larry. While I love your site, I have become more and more concerened along with other theatre colleagues about the reviews you write. We hope for them to be constructive and CRITICAL and also praising of those deserving praise. However, as of late the reviews you write seem to be nothing more than synopsiswith a line or two of "it was a good show". Do we have misguided expectations?

LARRY STARK REPLIED:
In a word, YES, you do.

I'm not in the business of "improving" anything.
I do try to tell people what is there, not what Isn't or Should be there.
I don't know enough about directing, or acting, or designing to presume to try. I am very clear when people introduce me and say "He's a theater critic";
I say "No, I Review Plays."
If you want "criticism" invite Carl A. Rossi or Bill Marx or Sally Cragin, or the EMACT adjudicators.
What makes you think that I know any more about your work than your director, or your acting coach, or your fellow performers? I'd trust any of them over ANY critic any day; they DO know something you can rely on and understand.

And that does Not mean "He Likes EVERYTHING" --- something you Can say, I think, about some other reviewers.
My threshold IS fairly low, and I AM finding that it takes longer and longer to get reviews written these days, but when I really Don't like a show, that show is Not reviewed publicly. Instead, I do try to send a letter to the director or producer giving good reasons why I couldn't recommend that readers of The Mirror see the show.
And my rule of thumb is simple: If anyone as ill-equipped as I know I am thinks he can see how to improve a show, the show must obviously suck dead mules..... !
But that's a reason to tell the creative staff, privately, to go into some other line of work, not a license to roast their tripes in public.
I mean, what if I were WRONG --- as I do believe many critics really Are; poor deluded souls, they take their little brief authority as not simply a justification of their shooting at actors who cannot shoot back, they all too easily become blind to their own elephantiasis of the ego.

I review plays.
That means I tell people who Have NOT Seen Them what is there --- I give them enough information about a show to make up their Own Minds whether they'd want to see it. I think there are enough other people monging opinions elsewhere.
But I Know I'm not Eliot Norton.
The best CRITIC at work around here is Geralyn Horton, who HAS acted in and directed and written enough plays for her opinions to Mean something. And, she takes more time than have for each of her reviews.
Me, I'm just a reporter......
and I like to Like theater.
Love,
===Anon.
( a k a That Fat Old Man with The Cane ) TO WHICH CAME THIS RESPONSE:
From: "Giagrando, David M." David_Giagrando@dfci.harvard.edu
Subject: RE: Reviews

Thanks so much for the response. I reallya ppreciate your taking the time to respond. Your candor puts it all into perspective for me. Keep doing what you do. It is great to know your angle. And we all share the common love for theatre...what a wonderful thing.

=+=+=+=+=+=

Date: Wed, 9 Apr 2003 17:15:25 -0400
Subject: Kushner......library
From: Geralyn Horton g.l.horton@mindspring.com

from playwright Monica Raymond

Just to add on about the Sunday event Geralyn wrote about.
The most shocking thing I learned was about the Clauder prize. Vogel says she won for "And Baby Makes Seven" in the first or second year of the prize. But part of the first prize was that the Huntington Theater here (large subscription non-profit Boston theater affiliated with Boston Univesity) would give the winner a reading.
The then-head of the Huntington refused to give her play a hearing, and so she received second prize instead. (For those who don't know it, "And Baby Makes Seven" is a very funny and wonderful and, in my view, much underproduced, piece about the prelude to lesbian parenting. Well, that makes it sound like some health ed piece. It's really about all the sub-personality imaginary kids the lesbian couple have created in their relationship, and what happens to them as the birth of a real child becomes imminent.

The play Vogel talked about that was a brilliant study of white liberal racism in the theater was Kermit Frazier's "Kernel of Sanity." She read it first in the 70s, and, so far, it has not been produced.
(Seems to be a three-character play for two white males and one African American man, if anyone wants to hunt it up and try to do it.)

She talked about scripts, many by young women, that are not getting done. They are passed from hand to hand "like samizdat" she said and teachers, other writers, directors, speak of them breathlessly "Have you read THAT one?"

Lucas talked about self-censorship, the kind that occurs when topics are not even brought to the fore, like the absence of gay characters in most American plays prior to the sixties, the unwillingness of gay producers in Hollywood initially to make films about AIDS, etc.

Enlightening, bracing, honest--I was glad to have been there.
Monica Raymond

=+=+=+=+=+=

Date: Tue, 8 Apr 2003 18:27:34 -0400
Subject: Re: Kushner, Lucas, Vogel at the Boston Public Library
From: Geralyn Horton g.l.horton@mindspring.com

Sunday afternoon I attended one of the New Center for Arts & Culture's WORDS ON FIRE events at the Copley Square library.
A sad beginning, when we walked up to what would last month have been a bustling beautiful public library, the oldest in the nation, and discovered guards at the door announcing that the library was closed Sundays from now on due to the budget shortfall. The lecture series-- "conversations" about censorship re: the Nazi book burnings on May 10th 1933-- carried on, however, and attendees were allowed to walk through the darkened galleries to the basement lecture hall, where Robert Brustein moderated a discussion on censorship in the contemporary American theatre featuring playwrights Tony Kushner, Craig Lucas, and Paula Vogel.

This event may be shown soon on weekend or late night c-span: the previous one, with William Styron and Henry Lewis Gates, was broadcast-- stumbling into Gates while channel surfing 1am is how I discovered that Kushner, Lucas, and Vogel would be appearing in Boston next.

All three playwrights were abundantly articulate and the notes here are only a fraction of the ideas, issues, and experience on offer-- I wish you all could have been there!

The event began with introductions listing the plays and books written by and honors bestowed upon all the participants--- which was so long that it threatened to take up all the time available and eventuated in embarrassed squirmings from the panelists and giggles from the audience.

Kushner was pretty upbeat. He listed various instances in which his plays-- "Angels In America" and "Homebody Kabul" had run into trouble, and the brave people at theaters and colleges who had stood up to censorship and pressure; and asserted that the ticket buying public and a few rich benefactors had rushed to the rescue, providing production funds and new venues when the scheduled ones were denied. Encouraging, that. But afterwards entire city or state arts programs might be cut from government budgets in retaliation. Most discouraging is the censorship that happens simply because the government support that makes it possible for theatres to take risks with new material has dried up. The NEA was founded to supply this support, which has been available in every era when there was great theatre-- the classic example is the way the Athenian state supported Aristophanes' satiric criticism of the war with Sparta in "Lysistrata" and Peace" et.al. during the time the war was being fought. 20 years of attacks on the NEA by the right have narrowed the range of what enters the public arena, and shifted the whole public dialogue rightward. Kushner urged everyone to work to restore and expand the NEA.

Lucas said he was discouraged and embittered-- though not about his personal situation, as he has recently found a nurturing home at Intiman Theatre in Seattle. He recounted instances of pig headed idiocy and insane censorship from his experiences in Hollywood and in theatre-- including one in which the central-to-the-plot kiss in "Prelude To a Kiss" had been snipped out of an airline's in flight showing of the film. Lucas despaired of critics, and of cowardly ADs pandering to boards filled with bankers, but was satisfied that in spite of critical hostility his published plays such as "The Dying Gaul" continued to get productions from venturesome small theatres. But he said that theatres are dying every day across the country, and the survivors are becoming ever more conservative and fearful. Authors look around and see what is "permitted"-- what is being produced-- and begin to censor themselves. It isn't necessary to burn books that don't get written.

Vogel was even less optimistic, and as passionate about the suppression of women's voices politically and the attacks on women's human and civil rights as she was about the dumbing down and flattening out of exciting-- and disturbing-- new voices in the theatre.
She gave the horrible example of an African-American actor turned writer she discovered when working as a play reader: everyone she took the script (about race relations) to agreed that it was brilliant, important, terrifying, and wonderful-- and everyone also said that they could not possibly produce it at their theatre. "Some one will do it, because it is so good. But not this theatre."
Some places did give it a "reading", and in response to post workshop "feedback" the writer over 20 years draft by draft took out everything that made his play brilliant, important, terrifying, and wonderful.

Vogel said that the men who are in positions of power in the theatre are not willing to let "others" in. She has "watched scores of women who have been turned away from theatres, and no one can tell me their work isn't brilliant: I've read it and seen it and I know that it is."
Selling out and working at screen writing or TV isn't an option for these women playwrights, they aren't welcome there either, and they must turn to teaching or some other career to support themselves. She believes in the principle that theatre's business is to bring us face to face with what we hate and fear, and that this function is failing out of theater managements' desire to do what "works' and what is "likeable".

Vogel also said that she is neglecting her own writing (her "How I Learned To Drive" won the Pulitzer) to spend 20 hours a day working with and for her students so that there will be a new generation of playwrights who (and this isn't how she put it, I didn't take down her exact words) respect and protect their individual voices.

As if in illustration, white men lined up at both the audience microphones and would have used all the time allowed for comment: except that when "last question" was announced some of the audience protested "Let at least one woman speak!"

Geralyn Horton
Newton, MA
Go see my SHORT PLAYS
http://www.stagepage.info/oneact/_oneact.html
Geralyn Horton
Newton, MA
Check out my FREE MONOLOGS
http://www.stagepage.info/monologs/_monologs.html

=+=+=+=+=+=

LARRY STARK'S ADDRESS IS:
125 Amory Street #501
Roxbury MA 02119-1075

(And, as Azdak says in CAUCASIAN CHALK CIRCLE:
"I Accept!")

To find out what
LARRY STARK REPLIES
and read lots of other Good Mail look in
The Greenroom
To add your own 2 cents e-mail to:
larry@theatermirror.com
New
Repertory Theatre Lyric
Stage
The
Conservatory
'Hovey Players Milton Coykendall Footlight Club
Join Theatermirror's Banner Program

Announcements

Basic Minimum Info on special announcements
For COMPLETE INFORMATION, CLICK ON Auditions

=+=+=8 May=+=+=

Far Too Many To Count!!!!

=+=+=30 April=+=+=

THE PERFORMANCE PROJECT Belfast ME
"The 15 Minute Festival"
Calls for Original Short Scripts
DEADLINE 15 May
http://www.15minutefestival.com

THE THEATER AT OLD WEST BostonMA
"A Walk in the Woods"
2 - 10 May

THE FIREHOUSE THEATER COMPANY Newport RI
"The Caretaker"
25 - 27 April & 2 - 4 May

Auditions

Basic Minimum Info on auditions
For COMPLETE INFORMATION, CLICK ON Auditions

=+=+=6 May=+=+=

PLAYWRIGHTS' PLATFORM SUMMER FESTIVAL/A> @ Boston Playwrights' Theatre
still in need of production personnel. send email to:
pbrennan@theworld.com

=+=+=30 April=+=+=

”>FIREHOUSE THEATRE Newburyport MA
"The Owl and the Pussy Cat"
28 & 29 April

”>INDUSTRIAL THEATRECambridge MA
"The Winter's Tale"
29 & 30 April

ATLANTIS PLAYMAKERS "Short Attention Span Playfest"
"The Baltimore Waltz"
"I Hate Hamlet"
4 & 5 May
Note: All roles are paid a stipend.

BROADWAY BOUND PRODUCTIONS Topsfield MA
"Children Of Eden"
9 & 10 May

=+=+=11 April=+=+=

CRANSTON (R.I.) COMMUNITY THEATER COMPANY
Broadway Musical Revue
18 & 19 May

THE SALEM THEATRE COMPANY
"Sylvia"
14 & 15 May

=+=+=8 April=+=+=

PLAYWRIGHTS' PLATFORM Waltham MA
"Heart of Art" (reading)
Call Robert @ 781-271-1044

TURTLE LANE PLAYHOUSE Newton MA
"Oklahoma!"
28 & 29 April callbacks 30 April

BAY COLONY PRODUCTIONS Walpole MA
"Grease"
12 April only

MUGFORD STREET PLAYERS Marblehead MA
"Our Country's Good"
10 & 12 April

THE SUDBURY SAVOYARDSSudbury, MA
"Hay Fever"
27 & 28 April

THE METROWEST FAMILY THEATER Wayland/Sudbury MA
"Bye Bye Birdie"
31 May ONLY Callbacks 1 jUNE

=+=+=2 April=+=+=

THE FOOTLIGHT CLUB 7A SERIES Jamaica plain MA
"Chocolate Cake"
14 April ONLY callbacks 16 April

Hovey Players is looking for a co-stage manager type
"Dangerous Corner" Bob Allen [jazz1@rcn.com] or Ronni Marshak[rmarshak@psgroup.com.

uploaded 28 March

THREE NEW AUDITION CALLS

uploaded 21 March

THE COMMUNITY PLAYERS Pawtucket, RI
"Crossing Delancey"
6 & 7 April

uploaded 20 March

WELLFLEET HARBORE ACTORS THEATER Wellfleet, MA
the 2003 season
12 & 13 and 19 & 20 April

uploaded 17 March

NORTH SHORE MUSIC THEATRE Beverly MA
'Roald Dahl's Willy Wonka Junior'and 'Ragtime: School Edition'(ages 8 - 18)
20 & 22 March

SUMME REVELS @ Watertown MA
"Midsummer Revels 2003"

THE BAY PLAYERS Kingston MA
""Night Sky
17 & 18 March

IRNE

The IRNE AWARDS PARTY this year
was held at the Hotel Lenox again

Click HERE to learn
How IRNE Works!

THE THEATER MIRROR
proudly announces the

INDEPENDENT REVIEWERS OF NEW ENGLAND'S
AWARD RECIPIENTS
& FINAL BALLOT NOMINEES
2 0 0 2

LOOKING INTO
THE APPLE

Letters From: "Mark Sickler"

Subject: Re: Please Send Comments to The GREENROOM

Hey Larry-
Boy was that a LOADED e-mail! Wow. How to respond???
Firstly, I am staying in NYC...I know...yes I am the poster child for career ADD. It also took me almost two hours to write this.

Firstly, let's just say that being a Boston based actor that accepts the Equity card is in for the kiss of death.
This has already been established. Why is that? From my perspective, having lived in Boston, it is a combination of a few things. Firstly, yes, the Boston talent pool is overlooked. Secondly, there just aren’t as many resources for the Boston actor as there are for New Yorkers. How many theatrical talent agencies are there in Boston? Does Boston have an equivalent to NYC’s “Backstage”? We can also count on one hand the number of Equity houses in Boston.

Additionally, your friend made mention of Equity’s obligation to guarantee a living wage, which I find most comical. I worked at BPT under an SPT Level 4 contract, and believe me it was HARDLY a “living wage”. Even if the Boston theaters started to exclusively cast from its own, there isn’t enough Equity work for a good actor to sustain a living wage full-time. The few Boston Equity members I know are also SAG & AFTRA, do voice over work, direct, stage manage or teach. In short, they utilize their craft in mediums other than theater. And even by removing the whole Boston vs. NYC from the equation, it still makes for a difficult situation. With a Boston actor facing all these obstacles, why would they stay in Boston, if THEATER is truly what they want to do?

Does it mean that they are inferior? Hardly. The best actors I know in Boston are all non-union. They are the ones that are deserving of the Equity distinction. Are the Equity actors inferior because the work is few and far between? Certainly not. It’s hit or miss for the NYC Equity actor also, but I do have to ask what the Boston Equity actors are doing in between their gigs? Are they traveling out of state to audition? Are they pounding the pavement here in NYC looking for work? I ask that because the NYC based Equity actors I know literally WHORE themselves for work. As a matter of fact, when we were casting for Three of Cups, one of the actors who read admitted to me that he couldn’t eat that week, because he spent the last of his cash buying his ticket on Peter Pan to make the audition. It sounds terribly clichéd, but true. And he didn't get the part! These actors will go anywhere for work. I work in travel. Not the best industry to be in right now, what with the unstable economy, the aftershock of 9/11, and the threat of war on Iraq, but if I lost my job and was offered an interview in Osh Kosh I’d be packing my things and heading to Wisconsin.

I do agree that Equity should be much more lenient when it comes to the secondary cities, particularly if a union actor wishes to do non-union work. When I read my first Equity handbook, I laughed for hours over some of the rules, having spent most of my time in a theater with less than 60 seats, and where the public bathrooms doubled as the dressing rooms. Most of those rules were designed for a time when conditions were abominable. Most of the conditions that Equity addresses no longer exist. Unless you’re doing a non-union tour, which, I recommend only doing once for the experience. For safety reasons, actors just shouldn’t be handling the load in/out of major set pieces every three or four days! Here in NYC there’s enough showcase work and staged readings to keep a union actor unpaid for years, but that’s certainly not the case in Boston. So in that respect, Equity should be rewriting the rules. Why punish an actor because there isn’t enough work to go around?

I know that there are going to be those out there who think that this letter contains very little sympathy for the plight of the Boston actor, being a former Bostonian who took himself and his union card to NYC. Yes, I referred to Boston as a secondary city, but let’s face it, New York is the epicenter of American theater. But just because I now live in New York (I'm a Bostonian at heart and always will be), doesn't mean I think it's fair.

Any actor, regardless of zip code should be judged on talent alone.

Besides, imagine how much these companies would save on housing and per diem by casting locally! However I still think that when any actor from any city receives his or her Equity card, the one question that they should be asking themselves is when am I moving to New York? Because if theater is the career you really want to pursue, you need to do what anyone in any career must do, and that is to go where the opportunities lie!
Regards,
Mark
Former member of AEA

New THEATER Websites

for our complete website list click here

Collected Thursday, 19 December

TheatreChannel.com
This is a sprawling, surprising attempt to cover all kinds of theater, pretty much everywhere, as thoroughly as possible. The "Where do you want to go" list is worth an hour of surfing-time... An astounding website!
Hand-to-Mouth Players Buchanan, NY
This website features a LOUD rehearsal pianist sound-track!)
"As a community theater group in Westchester County New York our goal is to entertain & involve the community, while offering affordable quality family entertainment to the greater Westchester County and Lower Hudson Valley region. "
Merrimack Repertory Theatre Lowell
Change in URL
Boston Casting Inc.
" Once you are listed with us, we do not hold interviews. We will add you to our active files and we will call you in for an audition that we feel you are appropriate for. There is no charge to be in our files. We are not an agent and we do not represent the talent. " (They can't think of a Single THEATER production they've handled, though...)
ArtsEditor
ArtsEditor is a monthly e-magazine, each issue of which has three long articles each on an art. In 2002, one of the arts was, occasionally, theater.
THEATRE 1 Boston
" THEATRE1 is a progressive theatre space that offers every artist the opportunity to produce and display their work. " (This basement space is much smaller than the website would suggest.)
Chicago
Take a look at this. It's the most exciting idea for expanding audience I've seen in years.
Jimmy Tingle's OFF BROADWAY Somerville
Jimmy Tingle is a social/politiical satirist and stand-up comic, who has bought a new theatre and intends to share it with others. Watch This Performing Space!!!
Zeitgeist Stage Company BCA
" Zeit-geist n. German: the intellectual, moral, and cultural climate of an era " David J. Miller's intense direction and trenchant choice of plays puts this company at ther cutting edge of Boston theater.

Food, Glorious Food!

"Aguillon, Michelle M." Michelle_Aguillon@dfci.harvard.edu
Subject: For "Food! Glorious Food!" Section on Theatre Mirror- what do you think?
Date: Fri, 14 Feb 2003 09:50:09 -0500

Hi Larry, dear. Would you mind posting this? A local merchant, sweet man, needs our help.
~ Michelle

Please Patronize Restaurant: A Local Supporter of the Arts

Chalee, owner of Baan Thai Restaurant and a Hovey Players corporate sponsor, recently sold his two restaurants in Boston to move his business to Waltham. Because of the economy and probably partly due to unusually frigid weather, Chalee's business has slowed a bit. Even though Chalee is reducing prices on a some menu items to help customers, he still insures the quality of the menu by travelling all the way to either Chinatown or Chelsea to purchase food supplies. He also makes 500 desserts each week for another Thai restaurant in Brookline.
More...

Click here for Full Reviews
Cricket's Notebook on Food

THEATER MIRROR RESOURCES

This is an alphabetical list of theatre and theater company names, addresses, and phone numbers from shows reviewed in The Mirror
I'm putting in e-mail and website and mailing-addresses right now,
and adding information from our Links-list;
I've gotten through Massachusetts so far...
Watch This Space!

The CABARET Website

Cabaret World Celebrates in March
Cabaret is alive and well and thriving in Boston. And in New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Washington DC, Dallas and dozens of other towns and cities across the country. Officially designated as Cabaret Month by the mayors of San Francisco and New York, March is celebrated in song from Schenectady to Singapore. Several states, including California and New York, are going state-wide with the designation and new cabaret associations are springing up around the world.

According to Stu Hamstra, publisher of Cabarethotlineonline.com (a free email newsletter which receives 30,000 hits a day), the Manhattan Association of Cabarets & Clubs (MACC) originally declared March as Cabaret Month in conjunction with its MACC awards. "Noting the falloff of club attendance between New Years and Easter-as well as the tendency of performers to take a break from even booking shows, they decided to create the MACC Awards, given out at the end of March, and Cabaret Month in the weeks leading up to the awards as a way to draw both performers and audience during this formerly 'dull' period. This year MACC will hold its 17th annual MACC Awards," explains Hamstra.

LIVE PERFORMANCES, SHOWS, SPECIAL EVENTS

Tuesday, February 25
ERICA LEOPOLD in A Burst For The Sky CD Release Concert, with Doug Hammer and the Beautiful Dreamer Orchestra, Scullers Jazz Club, DoubleTree Guest Suites, 400 Soldiers Field Rd, Boston, MA, 8:00 pm, $20 ($15 BACA members), dinner/show $55, 617-562-4111
Thursday, February 27
JOHN O'NEIL in Back to Enniskillen-An Irishman's Journey Home, Rabb Auditorium, Boston Public Library, Copley Square, 2:00 pm, free admission.
Friday, February 28
JAN PETERS in Old Fashioned, Please! with Tom LaMark on piano, Mark Carlsen on bass, Club Cafe, 209 Columbus Ave, Boston, 7:30 pm, $15, 617-254-2768
Saturday, March 1
WILL MCMILLAN, Cabaret Benefit for Afghanistan Relief Work and the Arlington Street Church Music Program, with Doug Hammer on piano, Arlington Street Church Parish Hall, 351 Boylston Street (corner Arlington and Boylston streets), Boston, MA, 8:00 pm, $12 door only, 617-536-7050 (directions)
Monday, March 3, Tuesday, March 4
CELIA SLATTERY in Moving Target, with Mark Shilansky on piano, Speakeasy Stage, Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St, Boston, MA, 8:00 pm, $15 ($10 BACA members), 617-437-7731
Wednesdays & Thursdays, March 5, 6, 12 & 13
VALERIE SNEADE in Her Name Is Barbra: The Streisand Songbook, with Jim Rice on piano, Raffael's Dinner Theater,1 Enterprise Dr, North Quincy MA, 12:00 pm lunch matinee $35.00, 6:30 pm dinner show $45, 617-328-1600
Friday, March 7
IDA ZECCO, with Jim Rice on piano, Szechuan Tokyo Restaurant, 1245 New Britain Ave, W. Hartford, CT, 9:00 pm, free, 860-561-0180
Saturday, March 8
MARY MAC in Songs of War and Longing, with her band Sukey Tawdry, at Jacques Underground, 79 Broadway, Bay Village, Boston, MA, 9:30 pm, $7, 617-426-8902
Saturday, March 8, Monday, March 10, Tuesday, March 11
PHIL RECTRA & MEG O'BRIEN in Under the Influence: New Cabaret Voices, with Andrew Byrne on piano, Speakeasy Stage, Boston Center for the Arts, 539 Tremont St, Boston, MA, Sat 11:00 pm, Mon/Tues 8:00 pm, $12 ($10 students/seniors), 617-437-7731
Sunday-Tuesday, March 9-25
BOSTON SINGS BOSTON REDUX, with Chip Phillips, Sean Roper, Melinda Stanford, various guests, and Tim Evans on piano, produced by Joe Antoun of Centastage, Club Cafe, 209 Columbus Ave, Boston, 8:00 pm (7:00 pm Sundays), $23-$25, 1-800-595-4TIX
Thursday, March 13
BOBBI CARREY in Between the Wars: Music from 1918-1941, with Tomi Hayashi on piano, Boston Public Library, Brighton Branch, 40 Academy Hill Rd, Brighton, MA, 7:00 pm, free, 617-782-6032
Sunday, March 16
CAROL O'SHAUGHNESSY, Ring a Ding Ding: Songs of the Rat Pack" with the Bill Whiteman Band, Newport Opera House, 20 Main Street, Newport, NH, 4:00-7:00 pm, $10 ($7 seniors/children), 601-863-2412
Friday March 21
JOHN O'NEIL in Back to Enniskillen: an Irishman's Journey Home, The Center for Arts in Natick, 31 Main St, Natick, MA, 8:00 pm, $10, 508-647-0097
Sunday, March 23
GRACE O'CONNOR in On A Clear Day, with Doug Hammer on piano, Cape Museum of Fine Arts (Cape Playhouse Complex), Rte. 6A, Dennis, MA, 2:30 pm, $15, 508/385-4477 x 15
Sunday, March 23
BOBBI CARREY in Between the Wars: Music from 1918-1941, with Tomi Hayashi on piano, Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St, Newton Centre, MA, 2:00 pm, free, 617-796-1360
Friday, Saturday, Sunday, March 28, 29, 30
BOSTON CABARET FESTIVAL 2003
Three Nights Celebrating the Songs & Songwriters of Cabaret
Friday, March 28 - Boston Traditions: Will & Company
Singer/host Will McMillan with guest songwriter Iris Tanner, plus songs by Krisanthi Pappas, Barry Rosenberg, Ernie LiJoi, Barbara Baig, David Stern and Dennis Livingston, Cambridge Center For Adult Education, 56 Brattle St, Cambridge, MA 8:00 pm, $12 ($10 BACA), 617-547-6789
Saturday, March 29 - Gala Concert: The Master Lyricists
Singer/host Sophia Bilides joins Mary Callanan, Brian De Lorenzo, Kerry Dowling, Kent French, Belle Linda Halpern, Manny Lim, Carol O'Shaughnessy, Jan Peters, and Michael Ricca, performing the lyrics of Johnny Burke, Sammy Cahn, Betty Comden & Adolph Green, Dorothy Fields, Ira Gershwin, Yip Harburg, Lorenz Hart, Johnny Mercer, Cole Porter, and Stephen Sondheim. With Doug Hammer, Tom LaMark, Brian Patton and Ron Roy on piano. Maxwell Auditorium, National Heritage Museum, 33 Marrett Rd, Lexington, MA 7:00 to 10:00 pm, $30 ($25 BACA or $50 Sat/Sun), 508-652-9834
Sunday, March 30 - Guest Artist: Amanda McBroom
Maxwell Auditorium, National Heritage Museum,33 Marrett Rd, Lexington, MA 7:00 pm, $30 ($50 Sat/Sun), 508-652-9834
Wednesday, April 2
WILL MCMILLAN, BRIAN PATTON, MICHAEL RICCA & NINA VAN SUCH At the Movies CD Release Concert, Scullers Jazz Club, 400 Soldiers Field Road, Allston, MA, 8:00 pm, $20, 617-562-4111
Thursday, April 3
CAROL O'SHAUGHNESSY & JAN PETERS in Gotta Get Gershwin! with Tom LaMark on piano, Boston Public Library, Faneuil Branch, 419 Faneuil St, Brighton, MA, 7:00 pm, free, 617-782-6705
Thursday, April 3
JIM PORCELLA & IDA ZECCO in A Tribute to Louis Prima & Keely Smith, with the Jim Rice swing band (Sam Butera & The Witnesses), Regattabar, Charles Hotel, 12 Arrow Street, Cambridge, MA, 8:30 pm & 10:00 pm, $20, 617-876-7777

Jan Peters, Old Fashioned, Please!
Tom LaMark, Musical Director, Mark Carlsen, Bass
Club Cafe - 209 Columbus Avenue, Boston, 617.536.0966
Friday, February 28th, 7:30 PM, $15.00
Please call 617.254.2768 for reservations. Reservations strongly recommended.
Named "The Best Cabaret Performer of theYear" in Bay Windows Newspaper 2002
Cabaret Year In Review, TheaterMania called Old Fashioned, Please!
Jan Peters Encore Cabaret Guest Artist Series/CD Signing Event hosted by Jan Peters
March 7 - Ben Sears & Brad Conner and Celia Slattery
March 14 - Brian De Lorenzo
March 21 - Bobbi Carrey & Tomi Hayashi and Paul Consoli
March 28 - Pamela Enders & John O'Neil
Encore Lounge / Cabaret
275 Tremont Street (in Tremont Hotel across from The Wang Center)
Boston 617-338-7699
No cover, no reservations required.
9:30pm - 1:30am

The Theodore Parker Church presents

At The Movies: A Musical Revue

Saturday, February 8, 2003 at 8:00 p.m.
Admission: $10 | Information: 617-325-4439
Theodore Parker Unitarian Universalist Church
1859 Centre St., West Roxbury

The Follen Angels perform "Our Kinda Guys: Sinatra, Montand and Chevalier "
Wednesday, February 12th at 8PM .
Scullers Jazz Club in the DOUBLE TREE GUEST SUITES HOTELS

RODGERS, HART & HAMMERSTEIN
Friday, February 21 at 8:00 PM
An Evening of Performance & Musical History
Singers Bobbi Carrey & Will McMillan
with Henry Schniewind on piano

Who: Brian Patton at the piano
What: Open Mike
Where: CCAE @ 56 Brattle Street in Harvard Square
When: Friday, January 24 from 8-11 pm (sign up starts at 7:30 pm)
Code: CJ24
Cost: $7 ($5 for BACA members)
Phone: 617-547-6789 ext. 1
Web: www.ccae.org or www.bostoncabaret.org

How We Spent Our Summer Vacations

"How to Start a Theater Company"

Small theater companies keep popping out of the woodwork here in Boston, but each one is the tip of an iceberg of planning and preparation, discussion, inspiration, enthusiasm and work. Some companies open with a big splash and then fade; some start small and build a momentum, some probably fail before their first opening night. So when the letter below arrived from Rob Bettencourt, I siezed on it as an opportunity to watch a new company grow from one initial seed.

TWENTY-FIFTY ENTRY

From: "fourthwallproductions" To: larry@theatermirror.com Subject: A Theater Entry and some support Date: Tue, 21 Jan 2003 12:24:51

Hey Larry,
I read your help in cricket's notebook. I feel guilty as hell too. I let you down and I am really sorry. The thing is the listings are too big for just one person. There needs to be a team of people I think that are just responsible for the listings, in case people get sick, get busy with life, other things happen. The listing won't stall but continue. I would not mind being on the team, as I said before right now my life is bit topsy turvey. But I do know how important the listings are and I know how much of a job they are. My hat is definitly off to you for running the whole website on your own for so long. Below is a theatre entry if you would not mind posting it when you get a chance I would apprecaite it.
Thanks
Rob Bettencourt

more

THE TWO BIG QUESTIONS:

WHAT'S WRONG WITH THEATER IN BOSTON?

WHAT ONE THING COULD CHANGE THINGS FOR THE BETTER?

Nothing new

=================

==================================

Features

Many past feature-stories and other goodies!

Stories ... by Anon.

BEDFELLOWS

Once Bob had whispered his message into her ear, and grinned for a second into her astonished face, he left the uproarious convention floor and went straight to his hotel room. He turned on the television just in case, but he knew nothing more of importance would happen that night --- not the move for acclamation not the boisterous demonstrations, not even Walter Mondale's acceptance speech --- so he undressed and got into a robe. When he found Libby's teary mascara-stains all over the shoulder of his shirt he kissed them, smiling, and threw it into the trash. He had won after all, as he always knew he would. He didn't know whether she would pay up, but just in case he took the tiny jeweller's box out of his luggage, and was placing it on the night-stand next to the condoms when a pair of small fists hammered loudly on his door.
Continued


Join Theatermirror's Banner Program

Welcome to The Theater Mirror

( You are visitor number to the Theater Mirror.)
Counter kindly provided by

as a courtesy to the Theater Mirror.



Join the Blue Ribbon Online Free Speech Campaign!

A note of pure obstinant pedantry:

THEATER is an art.
It is practiced in THEATRES.

Please contribute to our effort: mail a contribution to Larry Stark's Theater Mirror, 125 Amory Street #501, Roxbury, MA 02119.

If you'd like to tell us what you think about The Theater Mirror is, my name is

LARRY STARK

My internet address is

larry@theatermirror.com

Our Internet address is

greenrm@theatermirror.com


Design, Fabrication & Updating by the Web Master @ the Mirror

Read, enjoy, use,

and

Break a leg!


Join Theatermirror's Banner Program

Larry Stark's THEATER MIRROR, New England's LIVE Theater Guide, from Boston!
| CURTAIN | USHER | SEATS | INTERMISSION |

[ Plays Opening This Week ] [ Plays Up & Running ] [ Coming Attractions - Previews ] [ Reviews ] [ Auditions ] [ Special Announcements ] [ Cricket's Notebook ] [ The Greenroom ] [ Critics ] [Reflections ] [Features ] [ Web Sites Intro ] [ Theater Web Sites ] [ Theater Web Sites II ]


entire contents copyright © 1995 - 2003 Larry Stark's Theater Mirror.

All Rights Reserved.

Join Theatermirror's Banner Program